Miso Glazed Halibut

Miso glazed fish is one of my ultimate favorite things to eat, and I figured, why not try it myself?! I decided to go with the New York Times recipe because it was highly rated and heavily followed. I'd recommend a thicker cut fish, but you could use many types of white fish for this -- sea bass, halibut, cod, etc. This was SO GOOD. I highly recommend finding a fresh cut of fish and then marinating it for 24 hours if possible, but at a minimum 3 hours. Give this a try - you won't regret it! (I served this with a side of steamed broccoli.)


Ingredients:

4 fresh filets of cod, sea bass, halibut, etc. (about 6 oz each)

1/4 cup mirin

1/4 cup sake

3 tb white or yellow miso paste (I used white)

1 tb sugar

2 tsp dark sesame oil


Directions:

Combine the mirin and sake in the smallest saucepan you have and bring to a boil over high heat. Boil 20 seconds, taking care not to boil off much of the liquid, then turn the heat to low and stir in the miso and the sugar. Whisk over medium heat without letting the mixture boil until the sugar has dissolved. Remove from the heat and whisk in the sesame oil. Allow to cool. Transfer to a wide glass or stainless steel bowl or baking dish. Pat the fish fillets dry and brush or rub on both sides with the marinade, then place them in the baking dish and turn them over a few times in the marinade remaining in the dish. Cover with plastic wrap and marinate for 2 to 3 hours, or for up to a day.


Light the broiler. Line a sheet pan with foil and oil the foil. Tap each fillet against the sides of the bowl or dish so excess marinade will slide off. Place skin side up on the baking sheet if broiling. Place the fish skin side down on the grill, or skin side up under the broiler, about 6 inches from the heat. Broil for 2 to 3 minutes on each side, until the surface browns and blackens in spots. If necessary (this will depend on the thickness of the fillets) finish in a 400-degree oven, for about 5 minutes, until the fish is opaque and can be pulled apart easily with a fork.


Recent Posts
Archive